BYOB and Couch: Three Sheets To The Wind!

Well, butter my butt and call me a biscuit!  This here has got to be one of the funniest traffic stops I’ve ever seen!

Awwww man!  He’s just trying to make it up the road to his Maw-maw’s house.  And his beer is gittin’ warm!  Be reasonable!

It isn’t difficult to see that this man is already “three sheets to the wind”!

drunk squirrel

“Three sheets to the wind”;  THAT is an interesting phrase.   What does that even mean?  Well, I’ll tell ya!  Hold my beer and watch this:

The phrase “three sheets to the wind” is Sailor’s language.  Sheets are actually the ropes (or chains) fixed to the lower corner of the sails to hold them in place.  If three of these sheets are loose, the sails will flap causing the boat to wobble like a drunk sailor.  The earliest printing of this phrase, originally worded “three sheets IN the wind”, is found in Pierce Egan’s publication “Real Life In London” (1821): “Old Wax and Bristles is about three sheets in the wind.”  That is a great old sailor name!  If you want your own Old Sailor/Pirate name, you can generate one HERE.  Mine is Harriet “Thieving Magpie” Greep, The Raider of Otter Anchorage!  You can just call me Mags.

Remember folks, drink responsibly.  I will leave you with a lovely poem by the great J.R.R. Tolkien:

“Ho! Ho! Ho! To the bottle I go
To heal my heart and drown my woe
Rain may fall, and wind may blow
And many miles be still to go
But under a tall tree will I lie
And let the clouds go sailing by.”

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